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Lithuanian stamps 1941

PostPosted:Thu May 05, 2011 1:05 am
by Sergios
Hello,
I am new at the forum and I like to collect stamps of WWII. I am not an expert and I would like to ask some suggestions in this forum. I have two Russian stamps with the overprint Raseiniai and the date 1941.VI.23 (Michel Lokalausgaben n.1 and 7). They are used and the date of cancellation is 28.8.41, but in the cancellation the name Raseiniai is written with normal letters and in cyrillic, between the two names there are also the letters CCP and a design of the star with the scythe and hammer. Is this a forgery? Many thanks for any suggestions
Sergios

Re: Lithuanian stamps 1941

PostPosted:Thu May 05, 2011 3:48 pm
by Audrius
Sergios, welcome to the forums.

Can you upload scan of your stamps?

Re: Lithuanian stamps 1941

PostPosted:Thu May 05, 2011 4:58 pm
by Sergios
Image

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Many thanks Audrius, I am waiting your suggestions.
Sergios

Re: Lithuanian stamps 1941

PostPosted:Thu May 05, 2011 8:34 pm
by vitg
Sergios,
This is a good Raseiniai WWII local overprint stamp.
Overprint is Type III (all large letters) comes from position 9 in the sheet of 25 stamps.
The Soviet cancel dated 24.8.41.11 was used extensively for CTOs.
See attached example of these stamps also in Types I and II
Raseiniai.JPG
.
Hope this helps.
Vitaly

Re: Lithuanian stamps 1941

PostPosted:Fri May 06, 2011 1:37 am
by Sergios
Many thanks Vitaly for your informations because for me was a little strange the use of sovietic cancellation, but what means CTOs ?
After your very useful help, I hope to found the other stamps missing.
Wishes
Sergios

Re: Lithuanian stamps 1941

PostPosted:Fri May 06, 2011 9:40 am
by Audrius
Sergios,

CTO means postage stamps cancelled-to-order. There are many reasons why CTO exist. Stamp dealers use the supply of canceled stamps to create packets to sell to collectors worldwide thus create significant demand for cancelled stamps. Many postal authorities sell canceled, unused stamps at a discount directly to stamp dealers or stamp wholesalers. Such sales provide postal authorities and their governments with additional profits because they sell stamps without having to provide postal delivery services.